Tag Archives: Shared List Info

Shared List January 2020

The Red Thread Advocates blog used to do periodic postings of shared list data. As they are affiliated with WACAP, the blog has been a bit in flux after WACAP merged with Holt. I am going to try to share shared list updates on a regular basis because I found those posts helpful. Although it’s February, this data is from January 2020. There were no LID files on the shared list at this time.

Total Shared list files: 3223

Girls: 919 (28.51%)

Boys: 2303 (74.46%)

There are always more older children on the list than younger children. Almost half of all the files on the shared list are for children over the age of 10. More than a third of all the files on the shared list are boys over the age of 10.

Total children on the shared list over the age of 10: 1558

Number of girls over 10: 455 (14.12% of the total shared list)

Number of boys over 10: 1103 (34.22% of the total shared list)

 

Red Thread Advocates did posts with shared list data for both January 2018 and January 2019, so I thought it would be interesting to have three years in a row of the same month. The numbers are pretty consistent because the biggest jump in shared list files came mid-July 2017 when the partnership program was dissolved, though files added to the shared list did continue to increase through 2018. You can see the monthly shared list numbers from Feb 2017 to Feb 2018 in this Red Thread Advocates post.

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Here is the information charted a different way:

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Shared list data 2019

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I am happy to be able to again share data from files released to the shared list over the past year. Here is a link to last year’s post, but I will put the charts with 2018 and 2018 data below 2019 to make it easier to compare. A reminder that the elimination of the partnership program was announced in 2017. Partnership files continued to trickle in over 2018 but the overall number of files released to the shared list in 2018 was double that of 2017. There was another increase this year, but not to the same degree as last year.

  • Special focus boys was +99
  • LID boys was +9
  • Special focus girls was +59
  • LID girls was +35
  • Overall there were 202 more shared list files this year; 158 special focus and 44 LID
  • My thoughts on what this means for the future of LID files are in this companion post.

 

Here is the 2019 chart

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The 2018 chart

 

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The 2017 chart

 

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Shared list 2017 & 2018

In July 2017, the CCCWA announced an end to the partnership system. Any files which reached the provincial level of civil affairs by December 31, 2017 would still be designated to partner agencies. The general expectation is that the amount of new files posted the shared list would increase throughout 2018 as the partnership files came to an end. You can see on this chart at Red Thread Advocates that there was an initial jump in shared list numbers in July 2017 with a steady increase thereafter.

I was sent a summary of shared list releases from 2017 and 2018. Here is the information from 2017:

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There was no real increase in the amount of files released to the shared list by the end of 2017. However, by the end of 2018 the number of files released to the shared list had doubled.

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That’s a lot of data to take in, so here are a few quick points that can be drawn.

  • In 2018, file releases remained approximately monthly.
  • The amount of files released to the shared list in 2018 was double the number released in 2017.
  • Other than one abnormally large file release in 2017, the amount of files released was generally around 30. Beginning in March 2018, there were never fewer than 50 files released in a month.
  • However, this is still not as many as you would expect to see if all files were being added to the shared list. In 2017, a single large agency could receive 30 partnership files in a month.
  • In 2017 the number of LID girls per release ranged from 0-5, while in 2018 it was 0-12. Even with all new files going to the shared list, there were never more than 12 LID girl files released for all of the families waiting around the world.
  • There has been much speculation that the number of LID girl files is decreasing. There were more than twice as many LID girl files released in 2018 than in 2017. But again, this is not as many files as you would have expected to see if all of the partnership files were being released to the shared list. While we don’t have any way of knowing the total number of LID girl files prepared by the CCCWA previously, it seems safe to speculate that the overall number is down even though the amount posted to the shared list has increased.
  • The age range of LID files has remained consistent. In 2017, LID girls were as young as 11 months and as old as 8 years. In 2018, the youngest was 10 months and the oldest was 8 years.
  • There continues to be more boy files released, both special focus and LID. In addition, girls are designated LID at older ages than boys. In general, LID boys are under age 3, though they can be as old as 5 (with a single boy in the past two years being age 7).

 

It’s impossible to know what the future holds for the China program. I think it is still stable and a good choice for those families open to a moderate amount of needs, to children older than 3, and especially those open to adopting a boy. If you are a family that is only open to adopting a very young girl with minor needs, I would hesitate before signing with an agency. There were only 70 LID girl files released in 2018 and we know that some of them were for girls as old as 8. If you choose one of the most popular agencies, I can guarantee you that they have more than 70 families waiting in line ahead of you. There is no reason to think that the number of LID files of young girls will increase. In fact, there is a lot of anecdotal evidence that fewer files are being prepared in general, particularly after the change in orphanage donation requirement.

If you are starting the process now, it’s important that you choose an agency which is financially stable, but also make sure you ask about their number of waiting families. In the end, your child profile will be the biggest factor in your wait time to be matched.